Think Pink!

Red's sweet side is easy to fall in love with, and here's why


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Have you noticed that when looking out at a late-winter, snowy landscape as the afternoon is windng down, there's sometimes a magical, pink cast to the scene? The exact tone is hard to describe and, if asked, an artist — or one tuned into atmospheric colors — might squint and say, "There's a cottony pink-ness out there that seems to sort of coat the landscape. The snow's top layer almost looks like a meringue of muted, glazed pink, as do the tree trunks and branches that seem ready to shed winter." That Valentine-y vista is quite heartening to see because, in its dusty, ballerina slipper kind of light, one senses that spring isn't far behind. It's going to twirl onto the stage of our environment with fresh strokes of color in a matter of a few weeks! In the world of interiors, designers often use pink to convey that very optimism and hopefulness. And, say color experts, pink is considered sensual and passionate without being as aggressive as its red parent. Pink is, in fact, a perfect offspring — the middle tone of zippy red and pure and peaceful white — so it's not surprising that when giving or receiving flowers, pink blossoms are a favorite. "Pink is having a huge moment right now; it's so inviting, from its soft dusty tones to its brighter side," says Armina Kasprowicz, owner of Rochester Hills-based Armina Interiors. "I love pink — it makes a room warm and full of life." Kasprowicz warns, though, that if you're using bright pinks, do so in moderation — on an accent wall or in accessories. Or in a painting, like artist Kelly Ventura does here on this page. Ventura, of Milford, works pinks into many of her pieces. Find out why in this issues' Décor Showcase department.

 

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