Summer 2008

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Lap of Luxury

Whether swimming in style or enjoying a quiet evening on the patio, These six designs prove it’s never been easier to take it outside.

Brush Park

Detroit’s population swelled after the completion of the Erie Canal in 1825. So entrepreneur Edmund Busch -— recognizing the rising value of his family’s plot just north of downtown — began developing the area as a neighborhood for the city’s emerging elite.

Where There’s a Grill, There’s a Way

Big Rock Chophouse executive chef Jeff Rose shares the menu, recipes, and secrets to a perfect summer steakout.

Farming It Out

Built in 1855 by Squire and Dolly Rowe, their fieldstone farmhouse came with six acres and a spot on the state’s list of registered historic sites. When Brigid first heard the Rowe house was for sale, she immediately called her Realtor and told her they wanted it.

Personal Shopper - Stephen Knollenberg

If you were an interior designer, you’d likely know where to go for the finest fabrics, furniture, and art. But you’re not. So shopping for home décor is probably more of a hit-or-miss proposition.

Living Outside the Painted Box

Don Paul Young’s design for this Franklin home was ahead of its time when it was built in 1978. thirty years later, It still is.

The Garden State

Adding to an existing landscape can be a challenge. Making it seamless and believable takes capable hands.

Tour of Beauty

This year, the village celebrates its architectural pedigree with its 35th Annual Home & Garden Tour.

Bond & Bowery

These days, you can buy a wide-collared polyester shirt from a former disco devotee in San Bernardino with nothing more than a quick click of the mouse.

10x10_2

If writing about music is like dancing about architecture, what is writing about architecture like?

The Not-So-Amazing Criswell

Jeron Criswell King was wrong. A lot.Better known as “The Amazing Criswell,” King began making off-the-wall predictions to fill airtime while working as a Los Angeles-based radio announcer in the early 1950s.

Georgian

The Georgian home, usually a one- or two-story box, two rooms deep, is recognizable by the strict symmetry of its windows and doors. The paneled front door was centered and topped with a decorative crown, while its windows were aligned horizontally and vertically in rows, never in adjacent pairs.

Five Questions with ... Scotty James

Scotty James knows a thing or two about making what’s old new again. General manager of Materials Unlimited — a 15,000-square-foot architectural salvage showroom in Ypsilanti — James has a degree in historic preservation and two major home renovations under his belt.

Yes Sir, That’s My Burro

Right now, the majority of the world’s 44 million donkeys are doing the same type of work they’ve been doing for the past 6,000 years.

Interiors Designed

Even as a child, Jeanine White-Haith had an eye for interiors. When her grade school unveiled a new playhouse for the kids, she came away disappointed that it didn’t have curtains.
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